Posts filed under ‘adult education’

Public libraries & adult basic skills programs

 

Public libraries & adult basic skills programs.

 

Why Public Libraries and Adult Basic Education Programs Should 
Advocate For and Partner With Each Other.

Public libraries have an important role in promoting, providing, and advocating for adult basic skills services. There are a wide range of specific actions they can take wherever they are on the literacy action spectrum, from libraries that are new to thinking about adult basic skills services to those that are long-time providers of basic skills, often through collaborations with community-based adult basic skills programs, and those that advocate locally, in their state and nationally for resources for adult basic skills. Collaboration between libraries and adult basic skills programs can be mutually beneficial for both, as both parties can bring resources such as funding, space, knowledge, and technology, and can advocate for each other in their public policy advocacy work.

Open Door Collective–
Less poverty and economic inequality and more civic engagement and participation in all our society offers to individuals. ODC is made up of professionals working in adult basic skills, social services and poverty reduction, who believe that adult basic skills and lifelong learning programs can open doors of opportunity to healthier, more prosperous and more satisfying lives. ODC members have expertise in connecting adult basic skills to healthcare, employment and training, corrections, and family and social services.

September 27, 2017 at 11:42 am Leave a comment

Save Funding for Adult Education-Educate & Elevate

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Educate & Elevate
WHAT IS THE BENEFIT FOR PARTICIPATION?
​Any adult educator and adult education organizations may participate in the campaign. Your organization will be highlighted on the national website and you’ll receive marketing materials with educational webinars on how to execute successfully to get national recognition and build a business case of support for adult education. Collective storytelling and outcomes data make an impact to policy makers in helping them understand the value we bring to their priority agendas.

April 9, 2017 at 1:02 pm Leave a comment

Tending the Garden of Learning: Lifelong Learning as Core Library Value

Tending the Garden of Learning:

Lifelong Learning as Core Library Value

Abstract

Lifelong Learning is enshrined in the professional practice of librarians through the American Library Association’s “Core Values of Librarianship” (2004). As a Core Value, the term is extremely vague. What do we mean by lifelong learning, and why does the term have such a powerful hold on the imaginations of educators? This paper works to understand the term by looking at one of the earliest conflicts in American educational history and philosophy: the choice between student-centered schools and employment-centered schools. During the first decades of the twentieth century, America was struggling to define its national core values. Educational theory was seen as a key way to articulate and pass on these values. One pedagogical approach involved developing schools to educate individuals to become thinking and informed citizens; another administrative approach involved creating schools as vocational institutions to educate individuals to become skilled employees. After a brief debate, employment-centered schools emerged as the clear winner. Since that time American schools have been viewed almost exclusively through a vocational lens. The implications of this decision for libraries, schools, and learning are explored.

 

October 16, 2016 at 2:52 pm Leave a comment

Adult Literacy for All an Action Agenda

Adult Literacy for All an Action Agenda.
Members of the Library and Literacy Community of Practice, consisting of thought and action leaders from across the fields, came together for a series of monthly web-based conversations and a two-day face-to-face meeting in September 2013. Building on previous efforts such as the Literacy in Libraries
Across America (LILAA) Initiative and learning from ongoing initiatives such as the American Dream Starts @ Your Library, the project developed a National Library Literacy Action Agenda.

The Action Agenda is a series of recommendations intended to spur conversation, ideas, and action to integrate the public library with other services available to help adult learners improve their literacy and
basic skills.

May 17, 2016 at 11:32 pm Leave a comment

Public Libraries-Innovation and Opportunity in WIOA: A Playbook for Effective State Plans

Libraries and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

Our agencies have long recognized the role of libraries to help meet the workforce training and job search needs of the American public.  At the height of the recession, more than 30 million people reported using library computers for workforce related needs and 3.7 million of them reported finding work.  Today, 96 percent of librariessurveyed offer online job and employment resources and 78 percent offer programs to help people apply for jobs.

In July, the President signed the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA)which strengthens and aligns Federal employment, education, and training servicesOverwhelmingly approved by both the House and the Senate, the legislation is the result of a bipartisan agreement that recognizes the vital role the workforce system plays in providing the services and resources job seekers need to access the kinds of skills training, career information, and education that are required for today’s job market. The Act aligns with and complements the President’s Vision for Job-Driven Workforce Development, as it prepares workers for 21st century jobs and ensures American businesses have skilled workers to be competitive in global economy.

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Webinar Q&A Session for Realizing Innovation and Opportunity in WIOA: A Playbook for Effective State Plans

Q6. What role if any have you seen or can you suggest for public libraries in the state plan and WIOA implementation generally?

The main roles that public libraries have played as part of the workforce development system are as a provider of adult education and as points of access to the one-stop career center system through publically available computers.

Recommendations on how state plans can advance strategies for sector partnerships, career pathways, cross-agency data and measurement, and job-driven investments.

December 7, 2014 at 1:45 pm Leave a comment

Libraries and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

11.13.2014.  From the IMLS blog.

Libraries and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

Our agencies have long recognized the role of libraries to help meet the workforce training and job search needs of the American public.  At the height of the recession, more than 30 million people reported using library computers for workforce related needs and 3.7 million of them reported finding work.  Today, 96 percent of libraries surveyed offer online job and employment resources and 78 percent offer programs to help people apply for jobs.

In July, the President signed the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) which strengthens and aligns Federal employment, education, and training servicesOverwhelmingly approved by both the House and the Senate, the legislation is the result of a bipartisan agreement that recognizes the vital role the workforce system plays in providing the services and resources job seekers need to access the kinds of skills training, career information, and education that are required for today’s job market. The Act aligns with and complements the President’s Vision for Job-Driven Workforce Development, as it prepares workers for 21st century jobs and ensures American businesses have skilled workers to be competitive in global economy.

We are pleased that WIOA includes several exciting changes that better align federal resources and call for local community-based partnerships to increase access to services.  WIOA explicitly identifies public libraries as potential partners of the American Job Center network, and acknowledges libraries’ ability to provide an expansive array of job search services. It also recognizes libraries as important providers of federally supported training and employment for adult education and literacy. WIOA instructs state and local workforce development boards to boost “digital literacy skills” at American Job Centers – a task perfectly suited to public libraries!

We are delighted that the role public libraries play in workforce development is being acknowledged. Every day, people in communities across the United States use libraries to access the Web for career development—boosting their skills through online learning, improving their English literacy and digital literacy, and finding work. Public libraries can do even more with better collaboration with state and local workforce boards.

We thank American Job Centers, the nation’s employment skills training programs, and public libraries for all they do to serve our nation’s job seekers and contribute to the country’s economic vitality.   Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, we will deliver better coordinated services so that students and jobseekers acquire the skills needed in a competitive 21st century economy.

– See more at: http://blog.imls.gov/?p=5383#sthash.KWcTYFrb.dpuf

November 13, 2014 at 10:41 pm Leave a comment

Family Literacy- ALA Diversity and Outreach Fair

ala diversity and outreach fair

2014 Diversity and Outreach Fair

Saturday, June 28, 2014 | 3:00-5:00pm | Las Vegas, Nevada

About the Fair

Each year, the ALA Office for Literacy and Outreach Services (OLOS) invites library professionals from all kinds of institutions to submit proposals to participate in the ALA Diversity and Outreach Fair, which is held during ALA’s Annual Conferences.

Generously sponsored by DEMCO, the ALA Diversity and Outreach Fair is an opportunity for libraries and member groups to share their successful diversity and outreach initiatives with ALA Annual Conference attendees, celebrate diversity in America’s libraries and exhibit “diversity in action” ideas.

The Fair highlights library services to underserved or underrepresented communities, including people with disabilities; poor and homeless populations; people of color; English-language learners; gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people; new Americans, new and non-readers; older adults; people living in rural areas; incarcerated people and ex-offenders; and mobile library services and bookmobiles.

Each year’s fair focuses on a special theme based on service to one of these communities. The theme of the 2014 Diversity and Outreach Fair is Family Literacy.

Selected presenters will develop and facilitate a poster session to be held during the ALA Annual Conference in the exhibits hall.  In addition, the participants are encouraged to submit, in digital format, information and resources from their program.

May 20, 2014 at 1:13 pm Leave a comment

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